History of Australian Language

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It is believed that Australian English begins at the same time of first settlement in New South Wales in 1778. It is known that Australian words emerged in the historical dictionary of the English language in Australia in 1898. There are certain distinctive features of Australian vocabulary in this version. There is some evidence to suggest that the linguistic situation at the end of the nineteenth century was much simpler than it is now. This is due to new influences on the vocabulary, and later, the vocabulary and pronunciation of Australian English had become distinctively different from any model that British English could supply. The words that are commonly used in the Australian language nowadays come from different sources and situations. They are adopted into this language for different reasons. The main two reasons are: the immigration of English people and the accepting of local Aborigines language is believed that Australian English begins at the same time of first settlement in New South Wales in 1778. It is known that Australian words emerged in the historical dictionary of the English language in Australia in 1898. There are certain distinctive features of Australian vocabulary in this version. There is some evidence to suggest that the linguistic situation at the end of the nineteenth century was much simpler than it is now. This is due to new influences on the vocabulary, and later, the vocabulary and pronunciation of Australian English had become distinctively different from any model that British English could supply. The words that are commonly used in the Australian language nowadays come from different sources and situations. They are adopted into this language for different reasons. The main two reasons are: the immigration of English people and the accepting of local Aborigines language (www.austemb.org/people.htm).

The first English settlers brought over English to Australia. The Australian English language is much more nasal and less clipped than the British English accent. Though many American words and phrases have made their way to Australia, there are  still many common expressions typical of the Australian talk (www.austemb.org/people.htm).

Here are some examples:

“G’day” = Australian greeting

“Goodonya” = “Good on you”, used to congratulate someone

“She’ll be right, mate.” = Used to reassure someone

“Bloody” = Adjective used before almost anything and everything                

“Ankle biter” = Toddler, young child

“Arvo” = Afternoon 

(www.ockersdinkum.co.uk/).

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  February 16, 2001